Senate Approves Controversial Cyber-Security Bill

The Senate today approved a controversial information-sharing bill that detractors argue is too vague and could put Web users’ personal information in the hands of the FBI and the NSA.

The differences must now be reconciled with a similar House bill in conference before being sent to President Obama, who has indicated he will sign it.

Bill sponsor Sen. Richard Burr, a North Carolina Republican and chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, says the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA) “helps protect personal privacy, by taking steps to stop future cyber-attacks before they happen, not after Americans personal, financial, and private information is stolen by foreign agents and criminal gangs.”

End of quote.

The usual justifications have been rolled to support the implementation of unhindered tracking, monitoring and spying on everyone in the United States. Entirely to be expected. One more step along the path initiated by the inside job known as 9/11 and the subsequent false war on terrorism. It was only ever a matter of time. The police state implementation moves inexorably forward. Meanwhile most people sit glued to their televisions, enthralled by soapies and sport, oblivious to what they are inside of.

And people argue these goons are being disempowered? They must be on a different planet from this one. The next step will be to outlaw private encryption. Again, only a matter of time. Or massive restriction of the Internet. For now, it’s subtle. I was told earlier today that a Google search does not show my blog. Again, no surprise.

And if they feel the next round of tightening needs another false flag event to justify it, then it will happen. It’s called the Hegelian Dialectic. Problem, reaction, solution. Works like a charm.

And meanwhile most commentators stay focussed upon the actions of various nation states and their leaders, oblivious to the real, hidden game behind the public posturing. It was widely acknowledged that the Rothschild family owned perhaps half of all global assets at the end of the 19th century. And it got less how? Certainly, it became less visible.

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